Plane In-Flight Comfort

Rules may be broken,but first know them. This is a checklist of 10 travel rules for in-flight comfort that savvy world travelers know, obey or adapt.

An airplane flight is similar to being strapped into a seat and then thrown into solitary confinement. If planes were not the fastest way of travel, they would be avoided at all cost. Sitting in a small plane seat with nothing to see is by far the most boring and uncomfortable way of travel. Only the camel, donkey and vans as alternatives to buses are worst.

We seem to ignore the question, what did you see on the flight? In the past, airlines provided food, free drinks, newspapers, magazine and movies for free. However, we are now responsible for making our in-flight trip comfortable.

Your main goals for the in-flight plane trip are having a comfortable seat by comfortable people and find ways to relieve boredom while in solitary confinement.

Plane Head Rest

Traveling the world is for people who like people. If you do not want to talk to anybody and everybody, then you truly need to stay home because world travel requires you to be social. And boarding a plane that is small, tight and packed with seats just barely wider than the hips of an average person, coupled with randomly being seated next to strangers with no right to move, is dreadful travel.

These travel in-flight rules will helps you adapt and optimize your flight.

Non-Negotiable Rules for In-Flight Comfort

1. Be the last person to board the plane. Do not volunteer to enter the cramped and claustrophobic quarters of an airplane until required.

My friend Walt explains lines of people: “They learned to stand in line in kindergarten, and 50 years later than are still fighting to be first in line.”

Generally, there are 1-3 savvy travelers waiting to be last. They want to avoid the boarding line. Adapting to airplane flights is adapting; it is survival of the fittest, and there is no reason to enter a small compartment full of people until you are forced. We need to relax and sit back; the plane is not going to leave without you. Be the last to board; you walk in fast, with no need to wait, and the one or two stewardess are available to help because they are finished with the other passengers.

2. Be the last person to board the plane to choose the best seat. We do not allow an airline to make the rules; we make the rules. We choose the location, people and benefits; it is our choice, and airlines really do try to please. Planes generally have 5-15 percent of the seats empty. This is great benefit for the savvy air traveler. I do not want first-class seating; I want 3-4 seats together where I can lie down and sleep through the whole flight, if possible. The plane stewardess does to not like you taking a seat and then moving from your assigned seat. However, if you are last, you can just choose any open seat or multiple seats. If you look around, maybe there are 3-4 seats open in a series. This is good bed on a long-haul flight. If not, then you start to look for a good cellmate, someone who is friendly, small and happy. We can afford to have great manners for one hour, but spending 8-13 hours next the wrong people is never a benefit.

3. Ask the stewardess to help you move seats away from passengers who are not acceptable, noisy, unfriendly, obese, smelly, ill-mannered or disgusting. It is amazing: The stewardess has great empathy for this, and they will go to great lengths to make you happy.

4. Do not allow the stewardess to put your carry-on bag into an compartment behind you, only in front. And if a problem, get up when the plane takes off ad move it, do not just agree to having problems. The secret to comfort is expecting comfort as a way of life.

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Photos Plane In-Flight Comfort


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Comments 5

ElizabethIrish

I would agree with the boarding last recommendation but often the late boarders find no room in the overhead bins for bags. Great list though, thanks

Bill99

I have not been fortunate enough to find any empty seats on my out of country flights except once.
Way back when Northwest was still in business.
Flew San Fran to Tokyo with only 4 passengers in coach. The flight attendants were great.
They took us on a tour of the whole plane, fed us with 1st class food and I slept in Business Class.
Also got a phone number which worked out.
Best ever flight period!
Too bad the airlines have gone downhill.

Gadget

This is written to a global audience in mind, and for world travelers. The American market is often abused, standby, bumped flights, and other make money schemes. Then Southwest has festival seating.

Note, I have never heard of a bag not having a spot, this is difficult because 90 percent of the carry-on bags are actually too big to be a carry-on and the airlines look the other way and allow. I do not take a bag that will not fit under the seat, and always check a bag, but then again, I live the life of leisure and luxury, and I am never in a hurry.

Airlines will accommodate a traveler, and I suppose I should enter a rule that say the bag should always be in an overhead compartment ahead of you, never behind.

When first class travelers are accidentally bumped, I think, obey my rules dingalings.

island pilgrim

I wore a fly fishing vest, with 17 pockets. They weigh carry on, on some flights I use. My check through was 48-49 (almost the 50 max), the carry on was 15lbs (max) and they never asked about my fishing vest (under my suit coat). It weighed more than 15lbs. I just took the vest and coat off at security checks and it passed the radar test. Picked it up on the other side and off to the plane.

Gadget

That is fun, I have a hunting vest, with many pockets. I actually had a sheet and two pillow cases in it on the last trip. One time in the Frankfurt, Germany airport they said my bag was too heavy, and I walked away, pulled out my vest, loaded it, walked back up and checked in.




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